Aleyda Domínguez González

I went to primary and secondary school in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and it was in those formative years when I began to believe that journalism could change the world. In 1999 I moved to Madrid to enrol in Communication Studies at the Universidad Complutense. Since then I have avidly devoured any magazine that fell into my hands and I know the world of printed publications like the back of my hand. My magazine rack pays the price and I do my best not to overload it completely.

At Complutense I also took a postgraduate course in International Information and Southern Countries. I started off working as a reporter for the newspaper La Provincia/Diario de las Palmas. After that, I worked for seven years in the communication department at ARCO alongside Cristina who, years earlier, had given me a crash course in the subject “Theory of the Image”—and I still have the notes—and would then become my partner.

I no longer have any illusions about journalism changing the world, but art has taught me to understand it. Slowly but surely I am studying History of Art and every time I hear the wonderful exclamation “And that’s art!!”’ I’d love to beam myself up to another planet.

I have worked in the Technical Cooperation Office at AECI (Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation) in Nicaragua, and also in NGOs like SED (Solidarity, Education, Development) in communication and development cooperation projects.

In 2007 myself and my partner set up Acerca Comunicación and I should specify that, despite my Canarian lisp, it’s written with ‘c’ and not ‘s’. I will defend to infinity and beyond that it is absolutely essential to recognise that it is alliances that make the world go around. I love talking to and connecting with other people. Here I am working on exciting projects like the Elvira González gallery, the Loewe Foundation, the Drawing Room art fair, Donostia/San Sebastián European Cultural Capital, the Maisterravalbuena gallery and the Sandretto Foundation, among others.

I look at the world through purple-tinted glasses and I am a member of the network of women journalists Red Internacional de Mujeres Periodistas y Comunicadoras – Red Madrid. I’ll say it again, journalism cannot change the world but, as a wise Spanish journalist once said, it can stir consciences. Someday I will be reincarnated as a flamenco dancer and I will have a cultural radio programme listened to by 50 people. No one will argue with those ratings.